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really a fiscal slope. a downward spiral to something much worse. the possibility of going off the cliff is just 22 days away, and it sounds pretty ominous, but it could be a walk in the part compared with what could happen if lawmakers don't take a closer look at our bigger debt picture and soon. because what they're talking about is peanuts. president obama was in michigan today pushing his fiscal cliff plan. he made the solution sound so simple. >> when you put it all together, what you need is a package that keeps taxes where they are for middle class familiefamilies, w some tough spending cuts on things we don't need, and then we ask the wealthiest americans to pay a slightly higher tax rate. >> but not so fast, mr. president. we need a little more than you're talking about. president obama says his plan reduces the deficit by $4 trillion over ten years. forget the fact it counts war savings which shouldn't count. let's go with the $4 trillion. john boehner said his plan cuts $2.2 trillion over ten years. you shouldn't be comparing those two nubs. what you should think about is $16
away in lansing. let me ask you, jessica, the fiscal cliff is something we have been talked about each and every day here on cnn, the president met with the speaker of the house and am i correct, has it been about a year since the two of them had a one on one face to face, so what are we learning detailwise from the meeting? >> the bottom line is the status appears to remain at stalemate. the white house is eressing the view that the president believes it is still possible to get to a deal, but they want to hear more -- they want to hear specifics from republicans on revenue and they have not heard that. that's what the white house was saying before the deal -- before the meeting last friday they were saying this. the speaker's office is saying they still want to hear from the white house on more details on spending cuts, also that is what the speaker's office was saying before the meeting last friday. so the message today is exactly what it was last friday. the meeting happened yesterday. on sunday. so we are where we were. does that mean that nothing happened in the meeting? no, ther
. in gratitude, the government put me out of business. the fiscal cliff is something that we need to go over, that way we can enhance our military to special forces and get us some better weaponry. lose the people who are vacationing in all of these foreign countries, limiting the military to doing what it absolutely has to do. host: you are probably the fourth person here who has said we should go over the cliff. the headline from november in "the financial times" was that the fall in consumption would be $200 billion if we go over the cliff. that the u.s. consumer is crucial to growth, they went on to say, because it made up 70% of gdp. some are predicting a recession, a downgrade of our rating for the country. you think it would be ok to go over the cliff? caller: put it this way. only in the last 2000 years of human existence, every time a country goes above 20% tax rate, they failed. rome, babylon. go throughout human history. we are saying it is a 50% tax rate now. what about an 80% tax rate? we cannot survive as a government entity by having so many man hires attached to the host. hos
try to pass something in the senate that would have put food stamps on the table for the fiscal cliff negotiations and failed in the senate. jenna: let me ask you that is it part of the fiscal cliff negotiations or are food stamps in their own column right now? >> reporter: he tried. it is considered an entitlement program so it has to be funded. he did try to get the specific measure passed in the senate and it failed. jenna: any response from the administration on this? >> reporter: we reached out to the white house on this and want to give them opportunity to explain or comment on the fact under president's first term food stamps are up 39%. amount of americans dependent on them. the white house directed us to the u.s. department of agriculture and oversees this program and other similar programs. here is what they told us. the increase in snap participation during the 2008 and 2010 pared of economic decline which include the recent recession was consistent during increase in previous periods of economic decline. senator sessions and others make a point. the math doesn't add up. as
cliff argument. turns out he's not alone. let's look at something we've been seeing this week. >> stop instagramming your breakfast and tweeting your first world problems and getting on youtube so you can see gang 'nam style. ♪ gangnam style >> and start using those sprerbl social media skills to sign people up on this baby. three people a week, let it grow and don't forget, take part or get taken apart. these old coots will clean out the treasury before you get there. >> ifill: "these old coots will clean out the treasury." this is alan simpson in his best but a completely different venue. >> i talked to him today and he said "i think i could go around the world in 90 days and never had the impact that this silly little thing did." and the idea behind this, he's hooked up with "the can kicks back" helping young people try to get involved and get engaged in the fiscal cliff and making decisions. and they're using a lot of twitter and other social media to make their point. >> ifill: they tweeted "when politicians delay, young people pay, it's time to fix our debt." is this effective?
that we're not going to go over the fiscal cliff, or put everything on television. because i don't think i thought i would ever say this, but i do agree with grover nordqvist that this could give a hint about what each party is doing and who they are protecting. i think the democrats and the president would come out looking good on this, because from the very beginning they have said that they want to protect the middle class, extending middle class tax cuts. frankly, tax cuts for everybody on the first $250,000. republicans are saying no to that simply to protect tax cuts for the top 2% of the wealthy. let's put that on camera. let's let the american people see where each party is, who they want to protect, who they want to see move forward, who they want to make sure gets these tax cuts and who doesn't. and i think that would basically make them go somewhere. >> people just might buy tickets to a battle like that one. >> i think we could sort it out right here, actually. >> you think? >> absolutely. let's do it. >> the big shocker in the senate was the announcement by south carolina repu
. >> this could be another negotiating chip in the fiscal cliff. harry reid's threat. it could be something to try to get more tax increases out of the republicans. megyn: interesting. this is a huge deal back in '06. you haven't heard as much about it now that the shoe is on the other foot. the democrats find themselves in the minority they play rue the day harry reid pushed this through. new questions how to tell if someone is too high to drive. now that marijuana is legal for recreational use in two states, authorities are trying to figure out what the legal limit should be for getting behind the wheel after you toke up. this is why. video of a crash that look the lives of four teenagers. prosecutors say the 17-year-old driver was high on marijuana when he got behind the wheel. it happened on long island in october. the driver took a curb at 110 miles an hour. crossed three lanes of traffic and skidded into trees, one of whicher to the car in half. he survived but his friend did not. the new marijuana law weren't into effect in the state. people can smoke for recreational purposes. that means a
to think of this medium and long term risk as the fiscal avalanche. the cliff is something we are approaching now and we can see where it is. we know will hit the cliff. the avalanche is different. the only thing you know about avalanches, you know when the conditions are present. you know when the snowpack has built up to the point where it could happen. you do not know when it is going to happen, you just know it is coming. once it hits you, the avalanche becomes completely impossible to control. do you agree with this characterization about the avalanche? could you elaborate about that kind of threat? >> would you mind if i steal that from you? i will give you credit. i think it is right. i do think -- that is why what you're doing now is so important. this is a once in a generation opportunity for you to nail these things down. we're not that far apart. i really do not think we are. if you are able to put us on a credible path to fiscal sustainability, do it in a balanced way, i think we are golden. i think we will avoid that avalanche. if we do not do that, ultimately, it
they caused in the phone call as the country barrels towards the fiscal cliff. with no talks and no progress to avert the looming fiscal cliff, you could say the house has left the building, streaming out of the capitol. tomorrow's session cancelled. with only three work days left this year, they are often criticized. just 16 votes. across the country, rising frustration, americans asking why the holdup. and what will their taxes look like in 2013. >> maybe instead of getting my sister two things, you give one thing, you have to give pause on what could happen next year. >> reporter: today, president obama and house republicans are locked in a politicalstair staredown. >> we can probably solve it in a week, it is not that tough, we need that breakthrough that says we need to do a balanced plan. >> although the president seems obsessed about raising taxes on you, we feel it is not the right direction to go. >> reporter: it comes down to a tug of war over taxes. the president's proposal, increasing rates on americans making more than $250,000, to raise 1.6 trillion over a decade. house speaker
. is this something that can work out. like they did it wall street before the fiscal cliff hits? if we could rebuild when we're in such bad shape. host: thank you, judy. guest: repaying the money that was barred from social security. that money will be repaid unless congress does something different. think about the $2.7 trillion as spending authority for the social security administration. they can pay full benefits under the law. that money will be paid back over time unless congress changes something. putting more revenue money into social security, right now the appetite in congress is to cut spending. that might be a difficult sell. one reason the program is popular is it is self funded through payroll taxes. there's been a temporary cut in payroll taxes over the past two years. to change the funding of the nature could be done. advocates worry about the consequences of that and making it compete with other dollars with other government programs. congress doesn't touch it and still stays there. if it is competing for scarce dollars, it is more likely it will be cut. host: we saw a changeover a
the fiscal cliff and another recession. host: for that to happen, something has to happen this week? guest: not this week but every day that so little gets done raises the chance it will go wrong. i worry about that a lot. guest: it is a small deal, they can do something quickly. it may not require even a roll- call vote. to do the big deal, they did not have enough time to do the big deal when congress reconvenes on november 13. host: final word? guest: i think it is time to talk about the spending side. look at anyone trying to run a federal agency and they are being told the budget will be cut at 14% across the board beginning january 2. this is a ridiculous way to run a country. host: douglas holtz-eakin is the former director of the congressional budget office. stancollander thank you both for being with us. we will take a closer look of some of those special interest groups that are lobbying on behalf of what may happen with the so-called fiscal cliff. later, we will turn our attention to what is next for the u.s. and nato in relation to syria. other let's look at the guests and topi
out of work, and another recession. you want to know what's at the bottom of that fiscal cliff, well, there you have it. many say that what's going to happen if something isn't done soon, but guess what? alice rivlin has a plan. she's a senior fellow at the brookings institution and served as director of the white house office of management and budget, the omb, under president clinton. alice, good morning. >> good morning. >> nice to have you here on the show this morning. you're saying that it's too late for the lame duck congress to pass legislation to fix all the problems that exist, but you have created a framework for something that you call a grand bargain. what is it? >> well, it isn't just me. anybody who has looked at this problem, i was on the simpson/bowles commission and chaired another committee with senator domenici. everybody sees first that the budget is on an unsustainable course. we're on a course to accumulate more debt over the years and accumulate debt faster than the economy can grow. that's not sustainable. the grand bargain is that we have to do something abou
is that rationality will prevail and the president and congress shall make a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff and another recession. host: for that to happen, something has to happen this week? guest: not this week but every day that so little gets done raises the chance it will go wrong. i worry about that a lot. guest: it is a small deal, they can do something quickly. it may not require even a roll-call vote. to do the big deal, they did not have enough time to do the big deal when congress reconvenes on november 13. so the idea with two weeks to go is very small. host: final word? guest: i think it is time to talk about the spending side. look at anyone trying to run a federal agency and they are being told the budget will be cut at 14% across the board beginning january 2. this is a ridiculous way to run a country. host: douglas holtz-eakin is the former director of the congressional budget office. stancollander thank you both for being with us. >> and now a lookity role of lob yist in the negotiations on the so called fiscal cliff. this is from today's washington journal and is 25 minut
for you. make savings a new holiday tradition. ♪ >> thanks, wolf. >>> falling off the fiscal cliff, it may mean one thing to washington and something entirely different to millions of struggling americans. cnn's kiong la has the story. >> reporter: she could be facing at year's end a financial free fall. >> i don't know. i wish i wasn't in this situation but it is what it is and i could just do what i can. >> she lost her job as a new home sales manager on january. with an old laptop and a broken cord, she applies for jobs after job in a packed notebook, averaging 15 applications a day. at age 54, this is the first time she's ever been on unemployment. she's emptied out her savings account and now the emergency jobless program has kept her in her townhome giving her $450 a week. but unless the congress and the white house acts, the money stops. >> we're not trying to live off the system. we're trying to survive. it's not a luxury to be on unemployment. it's a means to keep us going. >> reporter: the fear of the fiscal cliff isn't just here. from the west to the north to the south, they wil
kids and the next generations. and on the right the road on the right is the fiscal cliff. really that the is choice if we don't do something about it we are going to go anyway. do you run over the kids with the car or do you take the other road which is not a good one but better than running over your kids fiscal cliff. it's a hard choice. >> but if we don't do it, if we don't go over the fiscal cliff the democrats will never cut a dime in spending. >> why would the democrats want change? if the bush tax cuts are going to expire they are saying this is great because this means the rich are going to pay more money, we are going to have more money to spend. they are already spending a the lo. they are saying why would we want change? this is great we have more money to spend. >> nancy pelosi saying why aren't we voting on middle class tax cuts? get to the other stuff. put this up for a vote: listen to nancy pelosi. we are not here to pass the middle income tax cut why are we here to not deat a time the middle income tax cut. could it be that the republicans are holding the middle i
the rhetoric that we saw from the treasury secretary tim geithner who said he's prepared to go over the fiscal cliff. that is not a good way to talk about what's going on right now. >> mr. reich, let me ask you the same thing. do you think there's code suggesting they are working towards something? because, doug, as you point out, the language was really harsh during this week. but all of a sudden, here we are friday evening and people are saying these kind of soft things that say maybe compromise. what do you think, robert? >> i think doug is right. it's too early to break out the champagne, but undoubtedly, the rhetoric is softening as we get closer and closer to the christmas holidays. these people want to go home. they want to have a holiday. they know that they cannot go home to their constituents and say essentially, i couldn't get anywhere. we're going to go over the fiscal cliff together. and that's particularly true and particularly difficult for republicans because the way the polls are showing the public's anger with this process, the republicans are going to get most of that anger.
: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: with the fiscal cliff fast approaching, i feel the need to point out something this morning that's perfectly obvious to most americans but which democrats in washington still don't seem to grasp. i'm referring to the fact that any solution to our spending and debt problem has to involve cuts to out-of-control washington spending. i know that might sound obvious to most people but for all the president's talk about the need for a balanced approach, the truth is he and his democratic allies simply refused to be pinned down on any spending cuts. americans overwhelmingly support some level of cuts to government spending as part of a plan to cut the federal deficit. yet, the president will not commit to it. he refuses to lead on the issue. the president seems to think if all he talks about are taxes and that's all reporters write about, somehow the rest of us will magically forget that government spending is completely out of control and that he himself has been insisting on balance. a couple of weeks ago we saw his plan. after four straight trillion-dollar
to solving the fiscal cliff? we put an offer on the table. the president now has to engage. >> you might even say he'll inherit these problems. >> the president is going away for christmas. he's going to hawaii for 20 something days. where am i going to be? where are my neighbors going to be? we're not going to have a place called home. where is the help? >> what's holding us back right now is a lot of stuff that's going on in this town. >> after the election of jimmy carter, he went to washington, d.c. and came back home with some bacon. >> that's right. >> that's what you do. >> the fact is this president basically i don't think wants to work with congress. >> we do not have a taxation problem. we've got a wildly out of control spending problem. >> i'll be here, and i'll be available any moment. >> we believe that despite obvious resistance to what has to be the framework of a deal here, that progress is being made. >> all of this is smoke and mirrors. all of this deficit reduction stuff, there isn't any. there aren't any spending cuts. >> greta: while democrats and republicans fight it out
the fiscal cliff. but where is it all going? house speaker john boehner went to the floor and spoke about his meeting with president obama for the first time. boehner and the president sat down over the weekend. boehner says the meeting was nice and cordial but went on to attack the president's offer on spending cuts. >> we're still waiting for the white house to identify what spending cuts the president is willing to make as part of the balanced approach that he promised the american people. the longer the white house slow walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering when is the president going to get serious? >> boehner and his far right caucus may find the offer unacceptable, but president obama has put a lot on the table. nancy pelosi hit back at boehner's rhetoric today. >> the fact is, the president has and democrats agree, to $1.6 trillion cuts. where are the cuts? in bills that you, mr. speaker, have voted for. >> pelosi is lobbying for house republicans to hold a vote on letting tax
of the campaign to reach out to the american people to make his case about the need to avoid going over the fiscal cliff and what his solution to that is. that would require that the top 2% of americans pay higher taxes. that is something he's been talking with republicans in congress about and believes is nonnegotiable. shaking hands there, and we're looking at the venue as well. that's where he's going to be speaking at the auto plant at the top of the hour. also saw the president last night at the christmas in washington charity concert in d.c. that event was hosted by conan o'brien and featured the legendary diana ross and psy, who was greeted by the president. the president did not attempt psy's signature dance, gangnam style. they were talking yesterday, but the president did suggest he thinks he can do it. he thinks he can do that dance. we're going to see if that actually ever happens. there was some controversy, however. psy apologizing on friday for anti-american rap performance he did eight years ago. it all seems to be patched up and worked out now. >>> also want to tell you about this
about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act in laying the groundwork for the 2013-2014 elections. >> why a writers institute? >> i think it is something that is very important. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are a key to our imagination, our capacity to imagine things. we are not completely tied to print on the page. there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps soma, which we work with, too. there is something in literature that captures the human. . the >> joint american history television and c-span local content vehicles as we look behind the scenes of a letter lives of new york city. >> next you hear from bradley manning's attorney about his case. he is accused of leaking classified documents to the web site wikileaks. the trial is under way in maryland. he testified earlier on the conditions he has experienced since being detained in iraq. this is half an hour. >> i really appreciate the turn out here, especially the turn of by the press. thank you for that. i have not participated in any public event for today. i also avoid any interviews with th
leader eric cantor says the house will be back in session december 17 to deal with the so- called fiscal cliff. he says the house will not adjourn until an agreement is reached. when the house gavels in next week, live coverage c-span. >> and think the writers institute is something that is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision things. we are not completely tied to print on the page. but i think there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> join "booktv," "american history tv" as we look behind the scenes at the history of new york's capital, albany. sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span 3. >> the joint economic committee today heard from the two economists on how to deal with the fiscal cliff. marchese said tax increases are necessary to reduce the deficit. senator bob casey of pennsylvania chaired the hearing. >> the committee will come to order. we want
. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. >> thank you, mr. speaker. we're in this fiscal cliff talks and the president and the speaker are trying to work out a solution. and they're talking about tax raters in top 2%. mr. cohen: taxing their wealth. that's something they should do because it's fair and it gives the over 98% tax relief. but at the same time they're talking about increasing the medicare age from 65 to 67. and that's taxing the wealth of the less fortunate people who are 65 to 67. for them and for everybody, your health is your wealth. jimmy copeland a friend and semiphilosopher said that, your health is your wealth. if you raise the medicare age from 65 to 67, you're going to sacrifice the health of people who are not the most fortunate system of while we tax the income of the most wealthy, we'll be taxes what wealth theless wealthy have, their health. that's wrong. mr. president and mr. speaker should not increase that age and tax the poor. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the -- does the gentlelady from texas seek recogniti
on the fiscal cliff, we cannot lose sight of their urgent priority of making sure we have job growth -- job creation, to say the least. many of the components you have outlined -- that both of you have -- it comprised of the broad description of the fiscal cliff whether it is the expiring tax cut provisions, the expiring tax cut extensions, and spending cuts as well. if you consider more, which of those would you consider having the biggest bang for the buck in terms of economic impact of those that we are discussing here today? >> it is a given that we will extend the current tax rates for taxpayers that make less than $250,000 on an annual basis. that is absolutely necessary. when you consider the other things that are happening -- in terms of the bang for the buck, the emergency unemployment insurance program is very effective. it is small in the grand scheme of things. cbo is estimating it would costs per calendar year about $33 million. but the economic opportunity for job growth compared to the unemployment rate would be measurably more than that. we are down to go to million people i
getting over the fiscal cliff, the deal getting closer to balance the budget is still very important. i do hope because of the discussion that tax reform is something that is taken seriously for this year. i think that is well overdue. there is not time to do it before december 31. it will give businesses a lot of assurances that the government is paying attention to what they are saying. >> you should tell barack obama to find a jim baker. >> think about each time we have reached a crisis point in our country there's been an institutional response to it. we created a central bank. that has proved to be enormous for the past five years and important for years before that. post-world war ii, we create a system and the department of homeland security. i wonder if there's not an institutional -- >> some did not work as well as others. >> that is exactly right. it reflects our values and the focus of the government. we should have a department of homeland prosperity. we need somebody other than the president to think about american competitiveness. something we've taken for granted because we
jerrick is here everyone, great to see you and we have been focusing on the fiscal cliff, and roll up the thing on the bottom of the screen, because 23 days left until the ticker goes. >> when you say jump, they say how high, now what i'm saying? you call for something and they say let's do it. >> they say we're going to do you one better, we're not going to put up the number, we're putting up the hours and minutes until it happens. >> alisyn: 23 days the point that clayton is trying to make. throw it out and obamacare, the new tenants of the president's-- >> i wasn't lying. >> alisyn: of the president's health care reform care flan in effect january 1st and let's break down some of the new costs that will be hitting some americans, investment income for households earning more than $250,000 will be taxed at 3.8% more, regular income above 200,000, a .9% medicare tax. >> clayton: the bottom line, the end of the day as these things go into effect. you're working just as hard. you work as hard as you are now, 40 hours 0 week or more, overtime and your check will be less, that's the bott
. >> lawmakers from both sides of the aisle met this week to unofficially discuss what is called the fiscal cliff. house budget committee ranking democrat chris van hollen, tennessee republican senator bob corker and other spoken of for him on the debt negotiations. the hour-long discussion was hosted by bloomberg government and the deloitte consulting company. >> good morning. i am the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today and thank you to delayed for partnering with us at this event. plenary lunch limburg just over two years ago we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop with data, tools, news and proprietary knowledge to help government affairs, government professionals make better and faster decisions. we are a long way to succeeding in that but a big part of it is convening conversations on the big issues that face the nation today particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly exceeds that far. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris v
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)